North Carolina Newspapers

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September 18, 2003
The Kings Mountain Herald
Page 7A
KM Woman's
ANDIE BRYMER / HERALD
Mayor Rick Murphrey, Fire Chief Frank Burns, Police Chief Melvin Proctor and
Councilman Howard Shipp talk over lunch Thursday at the Kings Mountain Women’s Club.
Club honors
local emergency personnel
By ANDIE BRYMER
Staff Writer
Police, firefighters, highway patrol, EMS,
rescue squad members, the mayor and city
council were honored with a lasagna lunch
Sept. 11 by the Kings Mountain Woman's
Club.
“These guys do so much for our commu-
nity,” said Sandra Murphrey, chair of the
club’s public affairs committee. “The
women of the club wanted to show their
appreciation for their bravery, dedication
and commitment.”
The lunch started in 2000 when the club
prepared a meal for a meeting between
emergency responders and a thermal imag-
ing camera salesperson. The next year, after
the Sept. 11 deaths of emergency responders
in New York, members made the lunch an
annual tradition.
Police Chief Melvin Proctor remembers
when the community was not as supportive.
The tide began to turn seven or eight years
ago, Proctor said. He credits the mayor, city
manager and council for the change. The
department also made changes, he said.
“Tt feels nice to be honored,” the chief
said.
Since the 2000 meeting with the thermal
camera representative, club members have
raised funds to make the purchase. The
camera, which detects heat, can be used to
detect fire. It also can be used by police to
find hidden or missing persons.
The club is now selling Monumental
Recipes, a cookbook members compiled.
Over 900 copies have been sold this sum-
mer. Members have reordered 500 addition-
al copies. Sales have come from as far away
as Myrtle Beach, members say.
Open Gate Garden Club meets
The Open Gate Garden Club met at
Lenora Morris” home Sept. 10 for its first
meeting of the new year.
After dessert was served to 18, president
Margie Bridges welcomed members and
guests Carolyn Reid and Linda Tallon. The
club collect was read in unison.
Flo Davies presented a program on .. <li
pressed flower pictures. She said pressed
flowers are a delightful and inexpensive
hobby. Sharp scissors, large phone book,
pretty fresh flowers, good glue and a heavy
weight are all that is needed. She
recommened TACKY glue which dries clear.
Flowers should be picked on a clear,
sunny day. If picked in damp weather, pick
whole stems and stand them indoors for a
few hours until the flower heads are dry.
Flowers are best picked just after opening.
Buds can be used as well, she said.
She compared pressed flower collages to a
jigsaw puzzle. By moving the flowers
around, the central shape gradually falls
into place. As the design takes shape, the
arranger feels tranquil.
Most arrangers think flowers should be
pressed for three or more weeks. This
depends on the thickness of the flowers.
Multi-petaled flowers like roses and carna-
tions must be broken into separate flowers
before pressing. Some pressed flowers are
fragile and require a light touch. Tweezers
are helpful in handling these delicate flow-
ers.
All pressed flowers pictures require a base
such as paper, fabric, wood, metal or plastic.
Old satin, silk, velvet and fine cotton are
excellent. Wallpapers create a textured back-
ground. Some wrapping paper lends an
embossed look.
To prevent damage from handling,
humidity and air, pressed flowers should be
kept in a tight sealed container.
Princess Grace of Monaco often made
pressed flower pictures. She founded the
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Garden Club of Monaco. She believed a gar-
den club in every city, town and village was
as important as a library or museum.
According to her family, she often talked
to herself while making pictures with
pressed flowers. She saw pressed flowers as
a good means for self expression. In 1977,
two of her pressed flower designs were,
used on postage stamps in Monaco.
Victorian ladies spent hours making
pressed flower albums and pictures.
Phyliss Carpenter gave Timely Tips. She
recommended bringing house plants
indoors. Gardeners should reduce water,
allowing containers to dry slightly.
Now is an excellent time to establish fes-
cue, perennial ryegrass and blue grass. Fall
vegetables like turnips, mustard greens,
beets, radishes, collards and spinach should
be set out now in the mid South. It is also
the time to set out transplants of lettuce,
broccoli and cabbage. As fall begins Sept. 23,
it is time to set out annuals, groom
flowerbeds, dig holes for bulbs and plant
trees and shrubs.
The minutes were read and approved.
Betty Grant was added to the Fair
Committee to help with an exhibit at the
county fair beginning Sept. 25.
Correspondences were read. A tribute to
Margaret Tate, written by Flo Davies, was
read.
Treasurer Polly Phifer reported that the
club has $613.83 in the treasury. Memorials
for Margaret Tate made up $215 of this
amount. The treasurer sent $10 to the state
Association of Garden Clubs for the Book of
Appreciation for Margaret Tate and she paid
$37.29 for pages printed from the club’s
book.
Jessie Collins talked about the Flora Fair
and about exhibits members are planning.
All members are encouraged to enter at
least one specimen.
The Flora Fair will be Oct. 15.
ithe Lot Financing Avaialbe * Buy Here, Pay Here ¢ On the Lot Financing Avaialbe * Buy Here, Pay Here ¢ On the Lot Financing Avaialbe Buy Here, Pay Here ¢ On the Lot Financing Avaialbe * Buy Here, Pay Here
Thermal imaging camera
BY ANDIE L. BRYMER
Staff Writer
Only $321 is needed for
the police and fire depart-
ments to get a two for one
deal on thermal imaging
cameras.
When the Kings Mountain
Women’s Club began
fundraising for one camera a
year ago, they expected to
pay around $20,000.
Fortunately, the camera
dealer has a two for one spe-
cial through September.
The club exceeded its goal
when Tex Source owner
Robert Bolin donated $1,000
Tuesday putting the club at
$20,679.
“The community should
be involved in something as
important as this,” said
Bolin.
Thermal imaging cameras
have been on the market for
eight years but have only
recently become reliable for
use in fires.
“This is another tool in
our tool box, like an axe,”
said Fire Chief Frank Burns.
The camera enables fire-
fighters to see through
smoke, locating victims. It
also helps them find the
source of the fire.
Firefighters can use the cam-
era to find “hotspots” in
walls. The camera will be
| drive almost over the top
helpful when building occu-
pants smell smoke but can-
not find the source.
The police department
will use its camera to locate
children and elderly who
have wandered away from
home. The camera also will
be useful in finding people
who are hiding. Because
people leave a heat print for
five minutes or longer after
leaving an area, the camera
will enable police to know
how many people have been
in an area and where each
individual stood or sat.
Andy Putman is 3
Anderson “Andy” Putman was three years old August
29. He celebrated August 30 with a Hotwheels racing party
at First Wesleyan Church Family Life Center in Kings
Mountain.
Andy and his family and friends enjoyed cake, ice cream
and party favors.
Andy is the son of Robert and Toni Putman of Kings
Mountain. He has an older sister, Ansley.
Grandparents are Jerry and Brenda Ross of Kings
Mountain and Wylie and Sis Murray of Sharon, SC.
Great-grandparents are Etta Parton of Kings Mountain
and Bessie Quinn of Rock Hill, SC.
ANDIE BRYMER / HERALD
Robert Bolin, owner of Tex Source, presents Karen Roy
of the Kings Mountain Women’s Club a check for $1,000
as Fire Chief Frank Burns and Police Chief Melvin Proctor
look on.
The women’s club has
raised funds through the
sale of its cookbook and
hotdog and Christmas orna-
ment sales.
Civic groups, businesses
and individuals have donat-
ed money also. Donations
should be make to the City
of Kings Mountain and
marked for the thermal
imaging camera. Checks
may be mailed to the City of
Kings Mountain, attention
police or fire departments,
PO Box 429, Kings
Mountain.
ANDY PUTMAN
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