North Carolina Newspapers

    Thursday, November—28, 15>46
HARRIS, N. C.
M. B. Robinson, Editor-Founder
Stalf columnists: Prof. J. O.
Gibbs, Dr. H. T. Medford.
Subscription Rates:
One year $1.00. Six months 50c
Per copy 10c
All articles for publication,
also all communications of a
business nature should be sent
to the Editor, Harris Herald,
Harris, N. C.
In change of address please
notify the Editor.
Advertising rates furnished
on request.
Entered Mtirch 25, 194G, at
the nostoffice at Harris, North
Carolina, as second-cla.ss matter
under Act of Congress of M.irch
3, 1879.
THAT A. M. E. CHURCH
FIGHT
and above board in matters
of money and bury their
greed and selfish ambitions
ratJier than injure the
/Church of their fathers and
shake the confidence of the
public in Negro Church
leadership.
Who can be surprised at
the growing trend of intel
ligent young Negroes to
ward Churches, the heads
of which are of another
race?
While we know our own
Church is far from being
without “spot or wrinkle”,
but based on published and
undenied reports, it’s hard
to disagree with the editor
ial in the New York Age,
October 5th, which closes
saying, “If the Bishops of
the African Methodist Epis
copal Church are incapable
of setting things straight
without the bitter invectives,
the juicy gossip, the riots,
fights and police, then every
la.st one of them ought to be
asked to quit.”
— Missionary Seer
w
.t
To start with, it’s none
of our business; but the
press of the Country has
given so much space in re
cent weeks to the spectacu
lar fight among certain
Bisliops and their cohorts
of the African Methodist
Church, that for a periodi
cal ; even of a sister church
might be considered asleep
if it did not at least notice
the melee.
It seems that question
able handling of finances
in “high places” .started the
trouble. Reports of mis
handling of other people’s
money always starts trou-
)le. It should always start
a move that will result in
I'emoving the proven guilty
party whether he be at top
or bottom of the Church.
Men ordained, set apart
and vowed to “Deny all
ungodliness and worldly
lusts and live soberly,
righteously, and godly in
this present world’^, ought
to refrain from handling
other people’s “filthy lucre”
and by all means mishandl
ing it. The leaders of early
Church found the cause
being criticized because
they were dabbling in ma
terial matters of the Church.
Those heads had the sense
and unselfishness enough
to get out of it and appoint
and trust some other men
to handle the material part
of the organization and the
Apo.stles give theii full
time to the souls of men and
women, — the work for
which Jesus had called and
sent them forth. Much of
the leadership of Negro
Methodism could get a help
ful lesson here. It would
seem a pity to wreck an
otherwise great Church or
ganization that could be
saved if the constituency
would rise up and demand
the early Church spirit and
management of the mater
ial to be inaugurated.
There is always danger
of leaders becoming “drunk
with power”, and the hand
ling of other people’s money
often adds to that drunk
enness. *
Such falling out, 1 a w
suits and near riots led by
top men of a Negro Church,
not only hurts the standing
of those leaders and that
(Juirch, but mo)-e or less
gives a black eye to all Ne
gro Church leadership. The
general public pays but
little or;no attention to the
“Z” or the “C” that makes
the difference in the three
Negro Melihodist bodies.
After returning from the
great A. M. E. Zion Sesqui-
centennial iit New York.
September 8-22, the writer
was accosted oh the street
by a layman that would or-
dinarly be considered intel
ligent. who said, “Say, what
was the matter with your
Bishops up there in New
York; getting drunk and
doing all that fighting?”
We replied, “Nothing like
that happened”, to which
the party retorted, “I read
it in the paper,” Of course,
we told him that the report
was not about Zion Bishops,
and the party, said: “Well,
I didn’t know the differ
ence.” There are thousands
and thousands who don’t
take time to “know the dif
ference”, when these scur-
rious reports are published
to the four corners of the
earth.
It would seem that men
holding the position of top
Chrisitan leaders in a
Church would hold their
tempers, be straight, fair
BENJAMIN
BAHNEKER'-
MATHEMATICIAN ^
STATESMAN
ENOUGH CANNOT BE SAID
IN PRAISE OF THIS GREAT
MAN WHO, AT 22. AtADE ONE
OF AMERICA'S FIRST CtOCKS*
IN 1731 BANNEKER WAS
BORN (A FREE CITIZEN) AT
ELLICOTT MILLS,MD. WITH
LITTLE MORE THAN AVERAGE
SCHOOLING HE BEGAN WORK
ON AN ALMANAC' THE FIRST
WAS PUBLISHED IN 1792 •
BANNEKER ALSO WAS A
MEMBER OF THE COMMISSION
WHICH PLANNED THE LAY
OUT FDR THE CITY OF
WASHINGTON.DC.// ,
BANNEKER'S NOBLE USE
OF HIS OWN FREEDOM IN HIS
FIGHT ASAINST SLAVERY AS
WELL AS HiS PROPOSAL FDR
THE establishment OF THE
FEDERAL OFFICE OFSECRETARy
OF PEACE MARK HIM AS ONE
OF OUR GREAT STATESMEN/
WILL BILBO BE SEATED?
Will Theodore Bilbo, U.
S. Senator from Miss., and
former governor of that
state be seated when con
gress meets in January?
That is a question being
asked by thousands of per
sons, clubs and organiza
tions in the United States.
The question is, not only
will he be seated, but should
he be seated. It is said that
his election was corrupt, il
legal and contrary to Dem
ocratic principles and prac
tices. Bilbo should have
been dealt with a long time
ago. His actions as a mem
ber of the world’s largest
and most influencial legis
lative body has been a dis
grace. After all of his work
again.sf and public .state
ments against and about mi
nority groups it 'seems that
like Napoleon Bonaparte,
he has now come to his Wa
terloo. We hope so.
With the convening of a
Republican Congress in Jan
uary we Amei’icans expect
and will receive many
changes in our system of
government, along with
some changes, none will be
more welcome, needed and
accepted generally than for
the senate to deny Bilbo a
.senate seat.
Another Mi.ssis.sippian,
John Rankin, congressman
has also been under fire for
some time and there is some
talk of putting him in his
place. He, like Bilbo is a
disgrace to not only the
South, but the nation as
well. The time has come
when our public leadei's
must more faithfully aiul*
truthfully represent Demo
cratic ideals rather than
certain group,s. When any
individual fails to do his
duty, or fights minority
groups, he should be put
down regardless of the sec
tion of the country in which
he lives.
The ((uestion i-emains, will
Bilbo be .seated ? If the Re
publicans expect to hold the
much needed Negro vote in
19-18 and afterward they
must meet the issue face to
face. What will the answer
be?
Staff ~
Followinj:: is a list of the staff
of the Harris Herald:
M. It. Robinson, Editor-Pub
lisher
Dr. H. T. Medford, Prof. ,J.
0. Gi-bbs, Staff columnists.
.less'e Lee Millei', Dist. Circu
lation Mgr.
Correspondents
Mi.s.-, Marion Brooks, Hollis.
Miss Kvelyn Robinson, Harris.
Mr.s. Bernice Cannon, Forest
City.
Miss Hazel Philips, Henrietta.
Mrs. Eugene Whiteside, Uree.
Mrs. Earline Whiteside, Bostic.
Mrs. .Janette Logan, Ruther-
fordtoii.
Mrs. Etta Mae Hill, New House.
Lero.v Il'olbert, Greens Creek.
Mrs. Maebell Dixon, Belmont.
Dr. H. T. Medford, Wa.shing-
lon, D. C.
Jessie L. Miller. Zions Grove.
Special Releases From
Rutherford County A. A. A.
Bureau Public Relations, War
Department.
Rutherford County Health De
partment.
And other informative sources.
WASHINGTO
■* ★ NEWS LETTER -k *
THE NEWS BEHIND THE NEWS
PAUL MALLON
Dear Sir: Enclosed you will
find $1.00 for one years subscrip
tion to the Harris Herald. I en
joy reading the copies I bought
vei'y much. Much success to you.
SADIE B. McENTYRE
R. F. D. 1, Tryon, N. C.
M. B. Robinson, Editor, Harris
Herald, Harris, N. C.:
■ Congratulations to The Harris
H'erald on its first anniversary.
The Herald is doing a good job
in promoting better race rela
tions and in giving the colored
peo))le of Rutherfoi'd county a
good newspaper. Congratulations
to Editor M. B. Robinson.
R. £. Price, Editor-Publisher,
The Rutherford Co. News.
O’Conner’s Grove A. M. E. Zion
church have on a drive and hope
to build a new church soon.
« Mr. Elmer Cook and Miss Gen
eva Young were happily married
recently.
Mr. and Mrs. Willie Boyd
were baptized recently at Mt.
Zion church. Rev. Lindsay, pastor.
Mrs. Hattie Rankins is sick at
this writing and in the Good Sa
maritan Hospital in Charlotte.
Zions Grove News
Jessie L. Miller
(Staff Coi'respondent)
Ellenboro News
Of Late Interest
Eunice Tuggle
(Staff Correspondent)
Washington — The headlines
said: “CIO Rejects Communist
Interrference ” at the opening of
its Atlantic City convention—but
it did and didn’t. What happened
was thi.s:
Hardpressed President Phil
Murray got the Communists In on
a statement denouncing them
selves. He induced three of his
unionists whom he would call
rightwingers to work on a policy
statement: Reuther of the Auto
Workers who is reputed a So
cialist, Rieve -of the Textile Woi'k-
ers and Murray of the New.spaper
Guild. But he also caused to work
with them three, whom he would
call leftwingers: Gold of the Fur
Worker.-:, an acknowledged Com
munist, Flaxer of the questionable
Public Workers and Quill of the
doubtful Transport Workers.
The difference between a Com
munist and a Communist ^mpa-
thizer is purely technical. As far
as wo'-ld foreign and domestic
economic policy is concerned (and
nothing else is) a sympathizer is
more dangerous than a Commu
nist party member because he can
wield more influence while claim
ing the right of immunity.-
It was this kind of CIO com
mittee which wrote a policy and
secured its adoption by the execu
tive board of fifty-one members,
saying, in effect: “We resent and
reject’’—“We will not tolerate
such interference,” but not pro
posing to do anything about it.
This kind of political flagella
tion or self-denunciation wa.s pro
moted to prevent something
wor.se, for instance, a purge at
tempt by CIO of its Communist
leaders. Advance word was pri
vately passed around within the
organization that “a sweeping
clean-up of Communists” would
follow the statement but it is
clear the Commie sympathi.zers do
not think so or they would not
have joined in. Indeed no one
thinks so, for the truth is simply
this:
The CIO is so deeply entangled
with the Communists it cannot
get rid of them. It is afraid of
a .showdown. Its leaders would
rather gloss over its predicament
with such statem'bnts of policy as
it produced to stop criticism—and
wait. The Commie symathizers
have seized control of local
unions. They have infiltered into
.secretarial and treasury po.sitions
in other unions, contrived eco
nomic and political policy and will
even deny they are Commies if
the party line calls for it, for un-
principied Communism calls for
even violation of oaths on a wit
ness stand. But next time they
have an opportunity to sabotage
Amei'ican foreign policy or hinder
domestic production, they will be
in the right position to bring their
influence to bear.
The problem of the CIO then
i.s how to get rid of Communists
in a democracy. Indeed the prob
lem of the whole Democratic
world similarly inquires how to
handle Communism in a free bal
lot permitting representation for
all parties.
There is a way—the establish
ment of reciprocal rights. It could
be done by law and pressure.
Some authorities wi.sh to extra
dite all members of the Commu
nist party, and this could also be
done under existing law in accord
ance with the J. Edgar Hoover re
port to the justice department.
Ever, the Democrats could thus
rid themselves of the Communist
party influence which is trying to
establish a balance of power over
them—but only that portion of
the movement. Such a law could
not ri.d the country of the influ
ence of the American ,Labor par
ty, which both unionist and lib
eral leaders have said is domi
nated by the secretly working
Communists in New York City.
But if a law were passed, giv
ing the advocates of Communism
no more rights than a Democrat
enjoys in Rus.sia, the infiltration
movement might be headed off
We do this in trade. Under the
reciprocal trade agreements, we
give trade concesitions only to
(ijvtse ^’oreign natio)is Which give
us concessions. Why not do this
in polities? Why not give Com
munists and their sympathizers
only such rights as they give us
in Russia—meaning none?
This would be a truly Demo
cratic and Christian approach to
a solution—not punitive, not bait
ing. Instead of leaving democ
racy a weak catch-all in which
even Gommies and their sympa
thizers can participate for the
sole purpose of destroying it, de
mocracy could become as ex
clusive as Communism.
Members of the Communist
party would thu.s be excluded en
tirely from participation in elec
tions and would thus lose their
influence. While their sympathiz
ers could continue current agi
tations, a clause in the law should
reqire them to remove themselves
from suspicion, and the pre.=sur,e
of a foreign power in domestic
unioni.sm as well as politics would
be removed. •
CIO might clean itself under
, such a law. Indeed Russia might
be induced to give the Democratic
party the right to vote in Rus-
.sian elections someday, abandon
ing its iron curtain isolationism,
and then, of course, her Conimu-
ni.=:ts would have a reciprocal right
to vote here. In case Russian
unions acquired the right to vote
against their government, they
would be restored rights here.
That would make it fair and even.
This is only a* personal idea, to
which anyone has the right to add
—or subtract.
Everyone here is busy picking
cotton and sowing grain.
The Flat Rock choir sang at
Mt. View church Nov. 10 during
the 3rd anniversary celebration
of the pastor, Rev. F. T. William
son.
Mr. Roy Thomas was burned
very badly recently. IDs brother
from Washington, D. C., visited
him here.
Rev. James and wife from At
lanta, Ga., visited relatives here
including Mr. and Mrs. Lemon
Tuggle.
Mr. James Blount is very ill
at, this writing’. Several of his
sons from Washington, D. C., vis
ited him. We really appreciate the
kindness shown to us during the
sickness of our father. The fam
ily.
Mrs. Fannie Dixion, Cleveland,
Ohio, visited Mr. and Mrs. W. L.
Tuggle.
M'r. Lucious Coleman was the
guest of Mr. and Mrs. Tuggle,
Mr. and Mrs. King and Mrs. Pearl
Dawkins.
Mr. Hersher Long .has been
sick, hut has recovered.
Miss Lynch is back as the teach
er of Webbs school, Mrs. M. S.
Gardner is back at Brooks Chapel
school. They are both good
teachers.
Mr. and Mrs. Monroe Laster
moved near Webbs school.
Maiwie Laster is hack in school
in Charlotte. She is the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Monroe Laster.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Roberts and
) daughter Miss Leatrice visited
The rally for Z,i.on.s Grove
church Oct. 27th was a success.
Rev. S. W. Brice, pastor preached
a fine sermon and the offering
for the day was $50.00. Several
visitors were present. Rev. Brice
preached his farewell sermon
Nov. 3.
Dr. W. D. Carson, P. E. West
ern 'N. C. conference spent a few
days ’with his brother, Robert,
of Nev,' Prospect, S. C. He is
looking forward to his annual
conference that meets in Salis
bury, N. C., Nov. 19th.
Recent visitors to Zions Grove
church include Mr. and Mrs
Walter L. Thompson, Asheville;
Mr. and Mrs. James Carson,
Montreat; Mr. and Mrs. Howard
Briscoe, Tryon; Mr. and Mrs.
John I'vIcEntire and daughter,
Greens Creek Baptist church; and
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Wilkins, Mon-
Ireat) N. C.
Mr. W. F. Gray has been on
the sick list, but is much im
proved at this writing.
Mr. John Miller, Washington,
D. C., spent a few days with his
home folks. He has returned to
Washington.
The weather has been very
favorable and farmers have been
busy harvesting their crops and
planting grain.
Our sympathy is also extended
to the family of Mr. Joshua Ed-
gerton, who recently passed at
the age of 96 years. He is sur
vived by three daughters, one
son, eighteen grand children, and
a host of relatives and friends.
He was buried at Mt. Nebo
church with Rev. H. B. Fergu
son conducting the funeral. '
Naval Reserves To
Be Called For Duty
(all categories), specialist (fire-
fighterV, and the commissary and
steward branches.
The duration of this recruiting
duty will be until at least July 1,
1947, providing services are sat-
isfactoi'y.
Charleston, S. C.—Officers and
men are needed for active duty
until July 1947 in connection
with naval reserve enlistments.
The bureau of naval personnel
desires to recall for active duty
reserve officers of the rank of
lieutenant commander and below,
including warrant officers; and
enlisted personnel of all ratings
of pay grade (1 to 3 inclusive)
and yeomen and pharmacist
mates of pay grades (1 to 4 in
clusive), except ships service man
UNION TRUST
A Complete Bank
ing Service
RUTHERFORDTON, N. C.
Mrs. Willie L. Fredrick is do
ing fine at her home
The following persons visited
Mr. and Mrs. Lemon Tuggle, Mr.
and Mrs. Otis Sober, Mr. and
Mrs. Ben Dillingham, Mr. Jake
Tuggle, Fallston, N. C. and Mr.
Alton Glover, Washington, D. C.
News In And
Around Belmont
Uree News
Mrs. Eugene Whiteside
(Staff Correspondent)
The farmer of this section are
happy to have had such fine
weather in which to gather their
crops, of which there i.s an abun
dance of fqod and feed made.
Miss Mae Freeman, daughter
of the late Mr. and Mrs. Walter
Freeman was married to Mr. Ed
ward Montgomery, son of Mr. and
Mrs. James Montgomery.
Mr. and Mrs. James Montgo
mery are proud to have their son
Pvt. Samuel home on furlough.
He expects a discharge soon.
Mrs. Gevena Allen is happy to
„ , ^ .have,, her husband, Cpl. Bobby
^r,, and Mrs. John, W. Bl-ou^\.Ai4#,/..liome bn furlough and to
alho Mrs. Mae S. Gardner. gge their son.
Our sympathy to' Deacon and
Mrs. Frank L. Logan, of Mt.
Nebo church on the death of his
sister, Mrs. Elvina Logan Sim
mons, Detroit, Mich. Mrs. Sim
mons is survived by her husband,
Rev. E. L. Simmons, two child
ren, four sisters, four brothers,
and a host of relatives and
Mrs. Maebell Dixon
(Staff Correspondent)
We had a fine session of the
Friendly Aid Union in its recent
session at Ellis Chapel church
near Shelby, N. C. We were the
house guests of Mr. and Mi-s.
Accor. Over $1300 was raised
with each person receiving
$112.50. The next session will
meet with the Salem Society,
I Sharon, S. C.
Home coming was at Henry’s
Chapel Oct. 20th. Rev. W. S. Nor
wood preached a fine sermon in
the morning and Rev. D. L.
Blakey preached in the afternoon
in the place of Rev. I. L. Hous
ton, who was unable to attend
on account of flu. $536.25 w'as
raised in the rally for our new
church.
Home coming was at Mt.
Pleasant church Oct. 27. The ser
mon wa.s by Rev. Reeter of Char
lotte.
The members and officials of
THE FAMILY
SHOE STORE
Forest City, N, C.
Shoes For The Entire
Family
W. L. Smith, Prop.
CITY RADIO &
JEWELRY COMPANY
Please remember us when you are in
need of radio and watch repairs. We
have 2 radio repairmen and 2 watch
makers and can give prompt service at a
reasonable price.
We have a good line of watches, dia
monds, wedding bands and other jewel
ry. Also Motorola and other good
brands of i’adios and record players. We
have phonograph records, batteries, ra
dios, parts and other items.
Next Door to Jones Meat Market
EASY TERMS CAN BE ARRANGED
Dial ^201
Forest City, N. C.
AVhy do the Russians broadcast
lies about us? Well, it’s a cheap
way to gain power and prestige
at our expense, and they know
we won’t do anything.
'The car business may never be
the same again. Too many liave
learned that a car built to run
100,000 miles isn’t vvorn out after
going 10,000.
It’s our own fault. Eveiy de-
sertioi' of principle, and every act
that shamed us before the world,
was an effort to please some
group here at home.
We must stop lynching, and we
can’t until th^> law applies to all
lynchiiigs, in all sections, regard
less of race.
MIDWAY BARBER SHOP
BUB DAVIS, Prop.
Established in 1929, and the only con
cern of its kind. A place to find many
hard to get items. We have especially
(for men) Loves Hair Cream. Nothing
like it on the market. No •water or stock
ing cap needed. For ladies Loves Hair
Silk also Dress Growing Pomade, Dand
ruff Remover, and all kinds of Perfume,
Powder and Lipstick.
MADE-TO-MEASURE CLOTHES
May he available in August.
Located In (The Bus Station Building
N. Cherry Mountain Street Forest City, N. C.
BUY YOUR FALL MERCHANDISE AT
BELK’S AND SAVE
BELK’S DEPT. STORE
Rutherfordton, N. C.
REDDY FOR BETTER lIGHT
There are a few simple things you can do to help
Reddy furnish the extra light needed for study,
reading, evening work, and cheerier interiors as
fall advances.
Use bulbs that are large enough for com
fortable reading and eye safety. .
Place lights wisely, to eliminate shadow.,
areas and resultant eye strain.
Clean globes and reflectors occasionally.
(Dust can cut down amount of light by one
third, or even morel.
And, of course, make sure that all sockets
are filled.
It’s Simple—BUY BULBS BY THE CARTON.
[DUKE-)' POWER COMPANY
    

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