North Carolina Newspapers

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PLANNING CRUSADE --Bishop W. M. Smith, left, and
R. L. Jones, chairman and vice-chairman, Committee on
Evangelism, A. M. E. Zion Church, go over plans for a de
nomination crusade that will begin Ash Wednesday and close
Easter Sunday. It is expected to begin in Houston, Texas and
continue throughout the nation, with special emphasis on
“visiting evangelism,” which includes a census on the re
ligious life of the family.
Zion Church Planning
Evangelistic Crusade
MOBILE, Ala. - Bishop Wil
liam M. Smith, Mobile, chair
man, Committee on Evange
lism, AME Zion Church, an
nounced plans last week for an
allout cresade by the denomi
nation to begin with Ash Wed
nesday, Feb. 23, and continue
through Passion Week.
He and Bishop R. L, Jones,
Salisbury, N. C., vice chair
man, have alerted every pre
siding elder to organize each
district so that the program
can be made most effective.
Bishop Smith has begun in his
area and is receiving reports
as to how the program is pro
gressing.
Bishop Jones is beginning a
publicity campaign throughout
his episcopal area that is sche
dule to begin !.. llouril.v. ;
as ana spread to Pennsylvania,
District of Columbia and thence
to North Carolina,
Bishop W. A. Stewart, who
From Raleigh s Official Police Files.
THE CRIME BEAT
BY CHARLES R. JONES
Girl Beaten By
Sister’s Hubby
Miss Delores Jones, 18, of
425 S, Swain Street, told “the
law” at 4;20 p. m. Monday, she
was \ isitine at her sister’s
house, 1001 E. Davie Street,
when her brother-in-law, Jim
my Earl Williams, 21, asked
her to leave.
She said before she could get
her coat, he started beating her
with his hands and fists, caus
ing bruises under both eyes.
Miss Jones signed an assault
and battery warrant and Mr,
Williams was “hauled off” to
Jail by Officers Otis L. Hinton
and E. Curtis Winston.
Mrs. Elwyna H. Holt Dies
In Hospital; Was Teacher
The mother of the first Ne
gro ever to apply for admittance
to an all-white school in Raleigh
is dead.
Mrs, Elwyna Haywood Holt,
55, of 1018 Oberlin Road, suc
cumbed at Wake Memorial Hos
pital Sunday. She had work
ed in the public school sys
tem of North Carolina, either as
a teacher or principal, for the
past thirty-three years,
D&ugSiter of the late Milton
Denton Haywood and Mrs, Lu
cille Grant Haywood, Mrs, Holt
was educated in the public
schools of Wake County and
graduated from Washington
High School. Later, she was
awarded the Bachelor of Arts
degree from Shaw University.
She was married to Joseph
Hiram Holt on Christmas Eve,
1932, and to this union was born
one son, Joseph Hiram Holt,
Jr., who during his sophomore
year at J. W. Ligon High School
was the first Negro to apply
National Urban League
Launches New Program
NEW YORK, N. Y. - The Na
tional Urban League, In cooper
ation with the Agency for In
ternational Development of the
Stats Depart m ent launched
Friday, a new service program
to provide training in communi
ty developments to visitors
coming to this country under
the auspices of the Agency. The
announcement was made jointly
by Whitney M, Young, Jr., the
Leaftse's national executive di-
presides over three confer
ences in North Carolina has al
ready begun a program in the
eastern part of the state that
he hopes to follow from Sun
bury to Carthage.
The presiding elders plan to
group the churches In given
areas and have these groups
join in a central meeting place,
but they will also prepare evan
gelist material to be used In
canvassing and witnessing.
Texas will be formed for house
to house canvas and the results
will be tabulated and used as
the basis for the drive.
The Public Relations Depart
ment, headed by Alexander
Barnes, is aiding in the pro
motion a d piblicity. Dr. E.
3. Itardgrf,* director, B»w<snu* of
Evangelism, is cooperating With
the committee and furnishing
different types of material to
be used In the crusade.
Woman Attacked
AwayFromHom©
Miss Eura Lee Knox, of 209
Bragg Street, came to police
headquarters at 3:15 p.m. Mon
day and signed a warrant against
James Andrew Privett, 24, ad
dress unlisted, for assault and
battery.
The woman stated Privett
struck her with his hands and
fists, and also kicked her. She
exhibited a bruised ,^ 6 .
The incident took place a
round 7 p. m. Sunday in a resi
dence at 1116 Pender Street, A
warrant is on file for Privett’s
arrest.
(Sc* CRIME BEAT, P. S)
for admission to the then all
white Needham B. Broughton
High School, only a short dis
tance from his home, during the
late 1950’5. His application
was turned down, although he
fS«« MRS. **. t >
j k
m |
w
i j V V.
t ' -
MRS. ELWYNA H. HOLT
rector, and David E. Bell, AID
administrator.
This service will give the vi
sitors a better understanding
and appreciation of life in the
United States, While emphasis
is being placed on helping visi
tors from Africa and South
east Asia, the service will al
so be available to other visi
tors, Young said.
Young also indicated that the
(See URBAN tXAOV «, P. *)
* * * 4 4. 4. 4L 4 *** * * ***** *****
St. Aug. Chaplain Has No
Commenl On Church Act
ipistupal
Vestry Cuts
Off Funds
Father Edwin Smith, chaplain
at St. Augustine's College here,
had “no comment" Tuesday as
the father of the only Negro
student attending Ravenscroft
Elementary School, from which
financial support was withdrawn
Sunday by the vestry of Christ
Episcopal Church. A separate
board of trustees will be set
up by the vestry.
Ravenscroft is located at 616
Tucker St., off Glenwood Ave
nue.
Furthermore, if Ravenscroft
If not operated as an Episco
pal school, the facilities and
buildings on the campus will
revert to Christ Church.
The enrollment of Father
Smith’s son recently brought
on a controversy within the
church several months ago. He
is the first and only Negro stu
dent ever to attend. There are
169 white students attending.
The headmaster of the school,
the Rev. W, M. Rosenthal, plans
to continue at the school, but
has given up the position as
director of religious activities
of the church to become priest
(See CHAPLAIN, P. 2)
Says Man
Had Been
Drinking
Miss Marion Williams, of
1014 Mark Street, reported to
Officers Lindsay Godwin and C.
R. Stinson at 5 p. m. Saturday,
that her boyfriend (name not
given) was watching television
... her h~me Friday at about
10:30 p. m,, when James Shep
pard came into the house.
The woman said Sheppard
“started calling her bad
names.” She declared she ask
ed him to get out of her house.
At this point, Miss Williams
admitted slapping Sheppard
once in the face, and she
said they “tussled” for awhile,
then he slapped her on the left
side of the head and picked up
a fire poker at her boyfriend,
whom Sheppard proceeded to
push out the back door.
The relationship between the
complainant and Sheppard could
(Sea BEATS WOMAN, P. 2)
CORRECTION
Mrs, Cassie E. Spence, of
632 Cumberland Avenue, who
was raped on Friday night,
Dec. 31, informed The CARO
LINIAN this week that she had
not seen her attacker, Jonathan
Alexander Granger, 33, Lynch
burg, Va., earlier that day, as
was reported in the paper, but
had seen him working in front
of her home last Summer.
She also said the reason for
her kitchen door being open was
because she had just come in
from feeding her dog, and for
got to lock the door.
Granger was bound over to
Wake Superior Court for trial
after a preliminary hearing in
City Court where medical evi
dence and the scratches on his
face served as reason to hold
him in the crime. A Superior
Court trial date has not been
set.
. tmmmA, * 3'S lfflß
1 g
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TAR HEEL B NATIONAL WINNER - Donna Warren, seen sorting clothing, learned last week
that her report, ’“Making Christmas Brighter for Unfortunate Children/* has been submitted
to the U. S. Department of Education, due to "Interesting topic and evaluation,*’ Assisting Donna
in a clothes-mendlng project in home economics at Sampson High School are Joyce Robinson
and Marcia Faison, Donna Is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Odell Warren, of Clinton.
THE CAROLINIAN
*
North Carolina's Leading Weekly
9 - _ 4- -T-
VOL. 25, NO. 10 RALEIGH, N. C„ SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1966 PRICE 15 CENTS
Beals Woman, Attacks Boyfriend
************ * * * * * * * *
FARMER PLEADS FOR UNITY
Ex-CORE
Head Asks
Cooperation
NEW YORK - At its Thurs
day Community meeting, As
sociated Community Teams,
Harlem anti-poverty agency,
heard James Farmer, former
national director of the Con
gress of Racial Equality, and
presently director of a nation
al anti-poverty organization
which is to deal with prob
lems of Negro education and
employment, explain how “the
civil rights movement and the
anti-poverty war must act in
concert - and complement each
other.”
During his speech before
more than 200 ACT’s Harlem
Domestic Peace Corpsmen, the
former rights chieftain explain’,
how civil rights gains •• j-t
be put Into pet sportive with
the fact that Negroes are ‘ ‘three
times more unemployed than
white people.”
Farmer explained because of
civil rights victories in the
South we can stop and get a “hot
dog or a hamburger,” but this
is a shallow \lctory for a man
who “works from sunup to sun
down for $2.50 per day”.
Turning North, Mr. Farmer
stated that the money now be
ing appropriated for the war
on-poverty was no where near
enough. “We want to esca
lade the war-on-poverty. One
(See FARMER ASKS, F. 2)
Support For
Hammocks Is
Increasing
Support for the Hammocks
Expansion is increasing, W. R.
Collins, Hammock Expansion
Director, announced Tuesday.
Early in the drive for expan
sion funds by the North Car
olina Teachers Association for
the Hammocks development, the
Craven County Unit, NCTA led
the state by pledging $45 per
teacher for the project.
This unit held the lead until
Jan. 25, when a check for $550
was received from the Caswell
County unit, NCTA as a spe
cial donation on the Hammocks
project. This amount is extra
and above the S2B minimum ac
cepted by the teachers of the
(See HAMMOCKS, p. *)
“WELCOME TO WAR”Vung Tau, South Viet Nam: An American soldier, of the 25th Divi
sion, smiles as a Vietnamese girl welcomes him with a floral wreath Jan. 18 at Vung Tau, some
40 miles south of Saigon. U, S. military strength In Viet Nam climbed to more than 190,000 men
with the landing of fresh troops from Hawaii and Okinawa. (UPI RADIOPHOTO).
Dr. €. A. Chick, Ex-CAROLINIAN
Scribe, Succumbs In Fayetteville
FAYETTEVILLE - Dr. Cla
rence A. Chick, Sr., a retired
professor who taught at Fay
etteville State College from 1938
to 1962, passed away on Jan.
18, at the local Veterans Hos
pital after an illness of three
weeks. For many years, Dr.
Chick wrote a weekly editori
al column for The CAROLI
NIAN entitled "In This Our
Day."
Dr. Chick was a native of
Union County, S. C. and was
graduated from Benedict Col
lege, Columbia, S. C. and Col
umbia University Graduate
School. Prior to serving at
FSC in the area of economics
and social sciences, Profes
sor Chick taught at Benedict
College and Virginia Union. He
was also an ordained minist
er with an intense interest In
serving rural churches, name
ly pastorates in Virginia and at
Red Springs, N. C. Lately he
was ministering to the St. Pet
er and Piney Grove Baptist
Churches of Hoke County.
Vitally interested in the civic,
political, religion, service, fra-
" jL ''l
DR. CLARENCE A CHICK
Testimonial Banquet Will
Honor Kelly M. Alexander
CHARLOTTE - Kelly Miller
Alexander, Sr., president of
the North Carolina State Con
ference, NAACP, will be hon
ored by friends and NAACP
coworkers at a "Testimonial
Banquet" to be held in Char
lotte, at the Queen Charlotte
Hotel on Saturday, Feb. 5, at
7:30 p. m. Clarence Mitchell,
director of the NAACP'sWash
irsgton, D. C. Bureau, will be
principal banquet speaker.
The banquet will commemo
rate Mr. Alexander's service
of: 15 years as an NAACP Na
tional Bear'd Member; 20 years
as president of the North Car
olina NAACP State Conference
and more than 25 years as an
active participant and leader
in the fight for human and
civil rights for ail people.
Alexander is a native of Char
lotte, where he attended the pub
lic schools. He holds a B. S.
degree from Tuskegee Institute
in Alabama and is a gradu
ate of the Renouard College of
Embalming in New York City.
A successful businessman,
Mr. Alexander is president of
the Alexander Funeral Home,
Inc., and the Alexander Mu
tual Burial Insurance Com
pany, both located in Charlotte.
Recently, the Alexander
home, along with three other
homes of civil rights leaders in
Charlotte, was the target of
bombs planted by persons or
temal, and collegiate endeavors
of the community, Dr. Chick
‘lent a helping hand and mind’
to a number of Board of Di
rectorships, viz. Mayor’s Bi-
Raclal Committee; Fayette
vllle-Cumberland Civic League
and/or Association;UnltedSer
vices Fund, compiling the larg
est amount of money in history
from Region HI; USO: Cumber
land Community Action Pro
gram, Inc.; American Red
Cross (for over a decade); Col
lege Heights Credit Union; a
recent trustee of the Fayette
ville Technical Institute; First
Baptist Church.
In addition Rev. Chick was a
former president of the N. C.
College Conference In 1957, as
well as a consultant to the Com -
mlttee on International Rela
tions of the National Education
(See DR. CIIICK, P. 2)
persons unknown but believed
to be members of racial hate
groups. None of the families
involved in the bombing were
KELLY ALEXANDER
hurt, A reward totaling over
SIO,OOO has been donated by the
Charlotte community and others
for the capture of the party or
parties responsible.
Holding memberships on the
National Board of Directors and
the Life Membership Commit
tee of the NAACP, Alexander
serves as chairman of the Na
tional NAACP Voter Registra
tion Committee, chairman of the
NAACP Southeast Regional Ad
(See TESTIMONIAL f. 8)
Body Is
Found In
Trailer
ZEBULON - Rufus Weaver,
61, of Rt, 4, north of here,
was found burned to death early
Sunday. Smoking In bed is be
lieved" to have been the cause
of his death.
The charred remains of Mr.
Weaver was identified by As
sistant Wake County Coroner
Truman S. Rhodes, as Coroner
Marshall W. Bennett was re
cently released from a hospi
tal after undergoing surgery.
The fire department received
the call of the trailer fire,
according to Fireman Windell
Perry, about 5:30 a. m. and
when the truck arrived on the
scene about five minutes lat
er, the trailer was almost burn
ed up.
The trailer, valued at SI,OOO
was a complete loss, according
to Perry.
Rhodes said the body was
completely burned. They only
identified it as being Weaver
by a broken leg, which he had
sustained earlier.
The assistant coroner said
he believed Mr. Weaver had
been smoking in bed, dozed off
and dropped the cigarette. The
body was found lying on top of
the springs of the bed with sev
eral quilts. It was taken to
(Sec MAN DIES, P. 2)
‘Neighbor’
Council In
Greenville
BY J. B. HARREN
GREENVILLE - About one
hundred Negro and white mem
bers and observers of the North
Carolina Good Neighbor Coun
cil gathered here at Eastern
Carolina College, Jan. 21, for
a meeting of eastern area town
and community officials in
terested in the promotion of
better interracial relations and
Job and educational opportuni
ties for minorlHes.
At least forty per cent of
the assemblage was colored,
with the staff being equally
divided between the races.
Highly respected David S.
Coltrane, State Chairman of the
Good Neighbor Council, (origin
ally created by former Gov.
Terry Sanford) is the sturdy
guiding genius who has helped
to bring order out of chaos in
several critical confrontations
in Tarheelia. Dr. Leo Jenkins
extended greetings on behalf of
the college. Then followed a
seminar on Law Enforcement
with Hwy. Patrolmen, City Po
lice Chiefs and Sheriffs parti
cipating.
Irving Tranen, Communi
ty Relations Service, U„ S. De
partment of Commerce, and his
assistant, Abraham Venable, a
long with Andrew M. Sechest,
of the same department, set
the tone of the seminars dur
ing the afternoon sessions- fol
lowing dinner in the college din
ing room.
This writer did not arrive in
(See GOOD NEIGHBOR, P. 2)
Publishers
Set Meet
In Capital
WASHINGTON, D. C. - The
Annual Mid-Winter Workshop
of the National Newspaper Pub
lishers Association will beheld
in Washington, D. C., Jan. 27-
29. Highlighting the meeting
will be addresses by Attorney
General Nicholas Deb, Katzen
bach and Dr. Robert C. Wea
ver, newly named Secretary of
the Department of Housing and
Urban Development.
The publishers will concern
themselves with editorial, cir
culation and advertisement pa
nel discussions. Participants
of the editorial panel will be
Roger B. Sarguhar, editor,
Montgomery County Sentinel;
Ben Gilbert, manager-editor,
Washington Post; James Wil
liams, editor-Washington Afro-
American,
Circulations panelists are:
Ha*-ry Gladstein, circulation di
rector - Washington Post;
Charles Davis, circulation di
rector-Afro-American; Robert
Robinson, Philadelphia Tr i -
bune. The advertising Afro-
American Newspaper; Joe
Brown, publisher, Denver
Blade; Balm Leavell, publlsh
er-Chicago Crusader; D. Parke
Gibson, marketing counsultant;
and L. H. Stanton, of New York
City.
The publishers will also fi
nalize plans for their annual
Rus swarm Awards which will
be made In March on the anni
versary of the founding of the
first newspaper, Freedom * s
Journal; the annual March ob
servance Os Negro Newspaper
(gee mmusimm, s». t)
    

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