North Carolina Newspapers

    Mrartitm Will Find Oar Col
■mac a Latchkey to Oyar 1600
Hoaes of Martia County.
VOLUME XXX—NUMBER 1
County Bonds Sold
For Good Premium
22 Bidders at
Sale Held Here
Last Saturday
St Louis and Winston-
Salem Companies are
the High Bidders
Martin County sdtt—sl2s,ooo ir
bonds Saturday in two scries. The
first $50,000 county home bonds, bear
ing 5 per cent annual interest, wew
sold to Kaufman, Smith & Co., of St
Louis, at a premium of 3.07 per cent
bringing $51,877. The second
$76,000 courthouse and jail bonds, sole
for $104.09 per SIOO in bonds, bring
ing a net total of $78,075.00. They
were sold to the Wachovia Bank &
Trust Co., of Winston-Salem.
There were 22 bidders for the bonds
coming from 10 cities and 7 States.
It is rather strange that only one bid
came from the rich State of New York
while the smaller State of Ohio made
11 bids; 5 each coming from Cincin
nati and Toledo, and 1 from Cleve
land. Next to Ohio, North Carolina
is second; Winston-Salem and Greens
boro each presenting two bids. Other
bids came from Illinois, Michigan,
Missouri, and Minnesota. New York
was the lowest bidder for the court
house and jail bonds, and only missed
being the lowest for the county home
bends by the small margin of S4O.
This would indicate that New York is
a poor bond market, but doubtless
they know their business and And it
more profitable to deal in distressed
bonds than in free bonds.
Martin County now has outstanding
seven bond issues, follows:
$160,000 bridge bonds, dated June
1, 1919, bearing 6 1-2 per cent inter
est.
$76,000 funding bonds, dated April
1. 1921, bearing 6 par cent interest.
* $300,000 road and bridge bonds,
dated March 1,1922, and bearing 5 1-2
per cent interest.
SIOO,OOO school bonds, dated Decem
ber 1, 1923, at 6 1-2 per cent interest.
$176,000 road and bridge bonds dat
ed April 1, 1926, 6 per cent interest.
Adding the two issues dated March
t of this year, for $75,000 and $60,000,
makex the county's total bonded in
debtedness $926,000; of which $6,000
on the SIOO,OOO school bond issue fcas
been paid, making a total due of
$919,000.
The board of county commissioners
has set aside a sinking fund sufficient
to mature the proper proportion
the total issues, which amounts to per
haps enough to reduce the bond debt
to around $876,000.
K wjjtl be observed from each issue
that almost the entire amount of out
standing indebtedness was to build
aehools, roads, bridges, or county in
stitutions, all of which would be ap
proved by an overwhelming vote of
tlie people to(ay. F
Cars Collide on Main
Sreet Corner Saturday
Kader Brown, colored, ran his Ford
touring car into a Ford coupe owned
and driven by Mr. W. H. Edwards here
last Saturday night. Brown was en
tering Main Street at the Atlantic
Hotel when he stepped on the accel
erator of his car and plunged into Mr.
Edwards, who was going out Main
Street
There were several passengers with
Mr. Edwards, but none were hurt. The
front wheel on the Brown car was
completely demolished, while the fen
der, running board, and a tire were
torn up on the Edwards' car.
At The
STRANrv
imral J
WEDNESDAY
Rod La Roque in
"THE CRUISE OF
THE JASPER B"
Third Episode of
"TROOPER IT
and 2-Reel Comedy
Also Free
Ticket for Friday
■ wi 1 r
Always a Good Show
THE ENTERPRISE
| What to Do With Him?
Iti.v, 11. ShooU and kill*
ire
F M fi
-ft 2S&
K4 wm
nrfsa-t- -■ - JBr f
Oaten a' 1.-." o, Mir'".:i«l Por
krsshaw, 11, went into :t :-'orc, J
attempted a I>--t■*: lier.irru* ex
cited—aii.l i.!»nt sr. I tlv
proprietor. M i:i.«l to. I . I,- ;• w
2 yeai - ;.t • «'c •'! -:.ul .\V» ~
\ crk au I >.«viiie i...0w »«»t .i .it
how to deal Will. ' Sii 1 *! It.
be triad on a r..u .. .
P.T. A. Meeting
at Bear Grass
Association to Present
Play, "Out of Court"
in Near Future
The Bear Grass Parent-Teacher As
sociation held its regular meeting In
the school auditorium last Thursday
evening at 7.30 o'cloc. The sixth and
eoventh grades rendered a splendid
"Good English" program, after whicn
the children were dismissed. The busi
ness meeting followed.
Mr. Leon Malone and Mr. Lee, prin
cipal of the school, were chief speak
ers. Mr. Malone spoke on "The Value
of athletics in the schools." He re
ferred to basketball as example. He
pointed out the benefits derived from
physical exercise—chiefly the benefits
gained by the individual, such as de
velopment of body, muscles, mental
development and self-control.
Mr, Lee made a very impressive talk
on "Beautifying the School Grounds."
He spoke of teachers as being dream
ers; he said the Spaniards dreamed of
a shorter route long before their
dreams were realized. The Panama
Canal project was dreamed of a cen
tury before it was completed during
Roosevelt's administration. Public
sentiment must first be molded in fa
vor of these dreams before they can.
be accomplished. The parent-teacher
at sociation can help mold public sen
timent in favor of these things by
working together as a solid unit. He
spoke of protecting school property
und showed how this school would
look when his dreams have been real
ized. The school should be a communi
ty center of which everyone should be
proud. Planting hedges, flower plots
end trees would add to attractiveness
oi the school grounds.
The parent-teacher association will
pre sen in he near fuure a play en
titled "Out of Court." Watch for the
date. V
SALLY ANN BAKERY MAKES
SPECIAL BREAD OFFER
The Sally nn bakery is making a
specail bread offer for next Thurs
day. All people visiting the bakery
that day will receive a loaf of bread
for only 6 cents.
JAMES UPTON HITS COLORED
BOY HERE SATURDAY
In Mayor's court yesterday moming
James Upton was required to pay the
cost of a trial brought about when he
slapped a .iMored boy last Saturday. J
Crusade Closes in Local
Church Sunday Night
The Crusade services at the Episco
pal church all of last week closed Sun
day night when the Rev. Mr. Halleck
jpreached a big sermon on "Little
Things". Mr. Halleck handled his topic
in a most entertaining and instructive
manner.
There was a large attendance, the
other churches of thetown suspending
their service*.
The sermon the week
were able ones and the services were
attended by large crowds
LEAVE THURSDAY AFTERNOON
TQ ENTER STATE TOURNAMENT
"Coach Hix of Everett* and Coach
Phillips of this place will leave with
their school teams next Thursday af
ternoon to enter the State Tourna
ment at Raleigh Friday and Satur
day.
Both coaches have talked little of
the prospective results, but a win is
in order for Ereretts while the locals
are expected to make a creditable
i
Williamston, Martin County, North Carolina, Tuesday, March 1,192 ft 7.
Jamesville and
Durham Play in
Finals Tonight
Game Will Decide East
ern Basketball
Champions
Coach S. E. Riser of the Jamesville
basketball team left with his boys
yesterday afternoon for Chapel Hill
w here his team meets ' Durham to
night. The contest will decide the
eastern champions and the winners of
the game will meet a team from the
west to decide the state-wide cham
pions.
Jamesvflle has eliminated in the
State championship series Edenton
Farmville, New Bern and Fremont,
and goes to Chapel Hill with a chattce
to win from Durham. The team has
gained a wide reputation this year,
first when it won in the peanut ex
position at Windsor and when it de
feated four strong teams to meet I
Durham in Chapel Hill tonight.
Last Friday night in Wilson, tne
county lads played one of the best
games of the season according to re
ports from that town, and won overi
Fremont 26-17/* An account of the,
» game stated hat they outplayed, out-1
passed and kept Fremont guessing
throughout the contest.
While the odds are slightly against;
Jamesville in the Durham game to
night, members of Coach Kiser's team
expressed a great determination to
fight the game to a finish.
Graded School Honor
Roll for Fifth Month
Following is the honor roll of the
local graded school for the fifth
month:
First grade; Miss Ellis, teacher:
Velma Bennett, Joseph Barnhill, Jo
seph Gardner, Janie Gurganus, Mart:
Gritfln; Myrtle Nicholson; Bert Felix
Peed; James Warbleton.
First grade, Miss Lincke, teacher:
Ella Wynne Critcher; Pete Kgan;
John Fleming; Carlyle Hall; John F.
Thigpen; Jean Watt's; Gwen Watts;
, Addle Lee Meador.
Second grade, Miss Ivey, teacher:
Edna Ballard, Howard Cone, Clayton
Moore, jr., Shamma Ramsey; Mary!
Robertson; Dolores Stalls; James Wil
liams.
Second grade, Miss Darden, teacher:
Frances Cox, Bolton Cowen; Milton
James; Jesse M. Hoffman; Kathleen
Price; Thad Harrison; Ben Manning; !
Exum Ward, Jr.
Third grade, Miss Harper, teacher:
Jessie Mae Anderson, Billie Griffin,
Henry Gurganus; Alice Harrison,
Grace Manning, Lawrence Lindsley.
Fourth grade: Josephine Anderson,!
Hilly Clark; Nell Clyde Harrisonrßil-'
lie Pope; Ruth Price; Julian Roebuck, i
Fifth grade, Miss Allen, teacher;
Myrtle W. Brown, Jane S. Moore;
Jennie Green Taylor.
Sixth grade, Miss Stanback, teach- {
er: Ruth Ward, Wheeler Manning.
Seventh grade: Chaarles Manning, i
Albert Leslie Clark, Edith Peele. I
Citizenship Department |
Meets Thursday at 4:00
The good citizenship department of 1
the Woman's club will have its regu
lar monthly meeting in the club room,
Thursday, March 3 at 4:00 p. m. All
members of the department are urged
to be present, and visitors are cor
dially invited.
The subject for discussion will be
"City government and public utilities."
We expect to have good talks which
will be well worth your while to
hear.
THE BUCKS ARRIVE WITH THEIR
PICTURES OF WONDERLANDS
Mr. and Mjp. Charles E. Buck have
arrived in the city with their pictures
of American wonderlands.
As we go to press the pictures are |
being shown in the Strand theatre to
a large audience of school children
and townspeople. A second entertain
ment will be given tonight at 7:46 in
the theatre.
—/ „
Woman's Club Meets
Wednesday at 2:30
The president of the Woman's club
announces a meeting of the organiza
toin for next Wednesday afternoon at
2:80.
Raleigh Celebrates 22nd
by 'Telling the Truth"
The reporter who stated that the
only phase of George Washington
celebration in Raleigh on Tuesday
was the telling of the truth failed
to explain just how much strain i
was *o the city to engage in such a
celebration. He also failed to explain
whether or not the Legislature par
ticipated.
Mr. Harper Holliday visited rela
tive* in Dunn during the week end.
00 Leases Made
Doheny Canceled
The gevemMat yesterday
wea its Ight it the United
States Suprewa Court, to csncel
the ail leasee and contracts a
warded Edward Doheny while
Albert Fall was Secretary of the
Interior. In a sweeping opin
ion the court held thst the lesse
by which the Dnheay interests
were to develop the Elk Hills
Nsval Oil Reserve end the con
tract by which they were to
build storsge facilities st Pearl
Hsrbor, Hawaii, #err tsinted by
frsud and corruption. The de
cision canceled bath lease and
contracts, confirming the find
ings of ths lower court.
22 Permits to
Marry Issued
Marriages in Upper End
of County are More
Nume*jfus
While the February record of mar
riage licenses issued showed a de
crease of 10 from the previous month,
it held its own and went ahead as
compared to the number issued in
February of 1926 and 1926. In Feb
ruary, 1925, the number issued wsa
17; in 1926, the sama month, It wss
14; and in last month the number
jumped to 22. The whites maintained
the lead for the greater part of the
time but last month the colored went
ahead when they secured 15 permits,
as compared to 7 issued to the whites.
The permits were well Mattered, some
going to the lower part of the coun
ty, but the greater, part going to
couples in the upper and of the county.
Licenses were issued as follows:
White
Harold Elester Hopkins, 20; Sudie
Asby, 18. Seth Bailey, 26; Atholeen
Dail (Beaufort County), 18. James C.
Gurkin, 40; Hilda V. Leggett 20. Si
mon Clayton Bailey, 19? Ethel Csppe,
19. William S. Corbett, 36; Mrs. Ly
dia Manning 25. John Williams, 21;
I Clyde Rogers, 18. Dempsey Rober
son, 23; Pearl Wells, 22.
Colored
William H. Brown, 21; Rüby
Turner Hines, 22; Lucile Lee, 19.
Dave Davis, 22; Letha Council, 20.
i Bennett Stancill 21; Estelle Roberson,
18. John Edwards, 39; Maggie Wig
gins, 26. Roosevelt Coffleld 22; Hat
i tie E. Barnes, 20. Willie Rogers, 20;
{ Tower Williams. Brisco Davis, Hettie
i Edmonds. Murray Walker (Washing
ton County) 23; lola Hunter, 18. Ulys
j ses Swanner, 43; Ida Cobum, 25.
James Black, 26; Lossie Jones, 22. Ar
! thur Taylor 21; Lillie B. Draper, 18.
Henry Knight, 40; Addie Clark, 21.
I Louis Sheppard, 21; Lottie Council, 22.
William Blount 18; Chelate Williams,
21. ,■
| Announce Rules for
Beauty Queen Contest |
Tho Eastern Carolina Chamber of |
j Commerce beauty Jjuecn contest will,
be held at Rocky Mount during the
exposition, April 4 to 8. There will
be two prizes, each $250 in gold. One j
prize will be given to the winner in '
the city of Rocky Mount; the other;
prize will go to the winner outside of.
Rocky Mount.
All candidates must register with
Secretary N. G. Bartlett, Kinston, N.
C , by 6 o'clock Saturday, March 5.
It costs nothing to enter. Candi
dates must be single, over 17 years
of age, and pretty.
The people of Rocky Mount will en
tertain each entrant in tho contest
during the week of the exposition.
Local Highs' Stock
Continues Upward
Basketball stock of the local high
school boys' team took another rise j
last Friday night when they decidedly
defeated Pantego 20-10. 'Even though
the game went without /natures, it
was one of the best the local boya
have played this season. The team
work wss evident and improved pass
ing over former games was noticed
from the beginning of the contest
The visitors played a hard game, and
showed up well for a first year team.
The locals are scheduled to meet
Nashville here tomorrow night in the
last game on the home court
Oak City School Will
Carry Play to Jamesville
The senior class of the Oak City
High School will present the play "An
Adopted Cinderella" in the Jamesville
school auditorium next Friday even
ing, March 4at 7:30 o'clock. 
The play met with much success
when it was given in Oak City last
* 7 •
Invite School
Committees to
Teachers' Meet
Demonstrations Will be
Held Showing Current
Year's School Work
Members of the several school |
committees of the county have been ;
invited to attend the Martin County
l'eachers' meeting in Robersonville
the 18th of htis month when demon
strations *of the work done during the
present year will be given with vari
ous school officials in charge. Messrs.
I>ee, of Bear Grass, Jones, of James
ville ami Pope of Willi&mston met
here yesterday and discussed plans
under which the demonstrations will
be held.
. Several worth-while demonstrations
are being planned for the meet that
day, and it is hoped that a large
, number of the committeement will be'
'in attendance upon the meeting. A •
j demonstration in the use of the square |
i will be given with Professor Overby
jof the Jamesville school, in charge.
The short story will take its place'
| on the program, Professor Ainsley, j
of the Oak City school, having that
particular phase in charge.
The meeting which is the last one,
of the year is expected to be the
largest one yet held. Bad weather in-1
terferred with the last meeting herel
and much of the work ia being carried
over to the one to be held in Rober
sonville, Friday the 18th. The date
was set for Friday so an to make it
possible for the school committeemen
to attend. While it has not been an-,
nounced, it is likely that the schools
of the county will have a haff-day
liolliday that day so it will be possible
' for all the teachers to attend.
Woods Fire Cost County
Thousands of Dollars
Woods fires that were raging in
many sections of this county several
days ago have about burned out. Few
.signs were seeti of fires in the past)
two nights, but there were some of 
little consequence. The loss resulting
from the fires of several days ago hasi
been variously estimated to range
It oin $35,000 to $60,000. Adjoin inn
count e have suffered similar fires, but 1
the damage estimated only includes
that done in this county. While sev-l
e*al houses were threatened by the
flames, there have been no reports that 1
enything other than timber was
burned.
The early part of the week fires in
I lower Beaufort were devouring large
I litretches of timber, but none of the 1
, details could be learned.
The State forestry bureau is spend
) ing thousands of dollars each in an
effort to prevent such fires, but each'
year this section suffers heavy losses j
from them.
Estimates of losses suffered in other!
counties have not been given out at I
this time, but they arc thought to be I
equally as great as those in this coun-.l
t> ' ' ' I
(bounty Man Joins, J
101 Ranch Shows
Mr. George R. Roebuck, of Hamil
ton, will join the 101 Ranch Shows, of
Marland, Okla. this spring. This is.
regarded as the leading show in the I
world for "wild west" and horseman- J
ship exhibitions. The firm that owns
the shows, Miller Bros., is composed
of three brothers, Colonel Joe, Colonel
Zack and George L. Miller, and all
ore men of high type and determined
oi> keep alive the thrills of the west.
Mr. Roebuck has trained his horse,
a Kentucky Jhorptighbred, for several
years uirtilnow he is to be taken to
Oklahoma to exhibit a new trick to
the horse family, not even known in
the west. Mr.' Roebuck has taught
his horse to hold a small piece of
paper, similar to a cigarette, in his
mouth for his master to cut in two j
v/ith a 16-foot Australian lash. It
seems that so far as is now known, i
no other hone has had such unflinch
ing confidence in his master that he!
stands stock still while the crackling
lash fans his lips.
Mr. Roebuck will leave for Okla
homa about April 16, taking with him
this horse, this particu
lar trick has taught many others.
He has exhibited him at the Martin
County Fair, where he did excellent!
work
Mr. Roebuck will doubtless make
good in his new work, as he is a man
who can be depended upon to do his
duty well, and he has the patience
necessary to train and work horses.
GREENVILLE HOMEGUARDS /
FAIL TO SHOW UP FRIDAY
The Everetts-Greenville basketball
game, scheduled for laat Friday night,
went through when Greenville's home
guards failed to appear on the, scene.
Three games were scheduled for that
night but only two were played.
|
IS
Dcs| >itc evasive denials, report is
current that Judge !■". H Gary, head
of U S Steel, plan* .to retire in
April ami that former governor-
Nathan Miller of New York (above)
is to take hi- place al SJt*I.UM .1 vear
Barnhill Bros.
Open Thursday
Have One of Most Up
to-datc Stores in
Section
Williamston welcomes the opening
of u new general store on Main Street
in the building recently vacated hy
11. S. Courtney. The new firm, llarn
hill Hros., is composed of Garland,
leamun, and Aibram I'. liarnhill, the
lueo olden sons of Mr. and Mrs. J. T.
liarnhill, of F.veretts, will formally
open Thursday,. March v l'hey have
remodeled' and made the store one of
the- most up to date in this section.
They will carry a full line of general
merchandise and will also handle gen
eral farm supplies and deal in coun
try produce. i
These young men have lieen raised
up in the mercantile business and are
well equipped with the experience es
sential to success.
Mr. N. K. Harrison will'be with
thom. He, too, has had a long experi
ence in the mercantile business. He
was for a long time with Hailey &
liarnhill, and after returning from the
World War has been with Harrison
Hros. & Co., of this city.
Local School Leads in
Comprehension Test
The results of a comprehension test
held in schools in the State last April
weregg i ven out yesterday by the
Superintedent of Public Instruction,
Raleigh, and according to them, the
local school led the county and went
slightly above the Stale
For the State, as a whole, Athe
median was, for thorough word knowl
edge, 64.7.1; for lowa comprehension;
16.3K, For Martin County, the median
was, for the, first, 60.57 and for the
hitter, 14.25. . Williamston ranki>l
highest in the two, having 65.00 for
through word knowledge ami 19.00
for the lowa comprehension. Other
schools in the county ranked as fol
lows, Jamesville, -60.83 and 1I.0U;
Oi«k City, 55.83 and lit. 16; Roberw
ville, 60.8H and 17.00.
While this method of testing the
rating of schools by many, little
weight can he given it since the test
is not truly comprehensive, that is it
test* in two instances while there 1
are dozens allowed to remain out.
To Begin Bible Study
at Baptist Church
Beginning tomorrow night (Wednes
day) the llaptist mid-week services
will go back to the usual time of
meeting, Wednesday night at 7.30
o'clock.
The pastor has been preparing for,
ami at this service will begin, a .se
ries of short studies on the books of
the New Testament. t
The first book to be taken up is
the little book of James, which many
of the scholars think to be the first
be ok ever written in the Now Testa
ment series.
The people interested in a fuller ami
more accurate study of their Bibles
will profit by following this course of
study, and are heartily invited to do
so. "•
■ : -%B
Kobersonville Wins
over South Edgecombe
On the Dixie cotiirt'here last Friday
night Roersonville high school g!rls
outplayed South Edegcombe in every
phase of the game and won 23-9.
While interest lagged in certain
periods, both teams fought hard from
the first to the final whistle.
RobersonVille meets Conway in a
semi-Anal game next Friday night in
Windaor. *
Watch the Laboi On Your
Paper; It Carries the Date
Your Subscription Expires.
ESTABLISHED 1898
Mrs. Nannie M.
Manning Dies
Result of Burns
Relatives Try to Put Out
Flames with Hands
but Efflbrts Fail
Mrs. Nannie M. Manning, died
at the home of her son-in-law, A.
\\ illiford Hardison, in Williams Town
ship, yesterday afternoon at 1 o'clock,
a the result of burhs received when
her clothing "caught tire about 7 o'
clock In the morning.
Her 9-year-old grandchild had got
ten up and built a fire in a heater and
gone back to bed. Mrs. Manning then
got up and was dressing when her
•clothing caught tire. The children
saw the tire and cried out, but before
_Mrs. Hardison could reach the room
she met Mrs. Manning at her room
door wrapped fn flames. Mrs. Har
dison found it impossible to beat the
| flames out with her hands and had to
| run for a bucket of water and it re
quired a second bucket to entirely ex
tinguish the flames, after which it
was found that she was burned to a
blister almost all over except her face
and the top of her head
\Slie did npt seem to suffer so much,
mplaining very little except with
her hands. She retained per
fect clHWciousness until about an hour
before her death.
Mrs. Manning, before her marriage,
was Miss Nannie M. Stewart, of Wil
liamston, am) was raised by Elder
Joseph I), Biggs near Skewarkco
Church. She was about 70 years old.
She was married to Joseph A. Man
ningh who died about 25 years agp.
She Reaves four sons. Henry and Joe
Manning, of Wilson, John E. Ma ruling,
of Merry Hill, and Will 11. Manning
of Williamston, and two daughters,
Mrs. I.Cl'cian Hardison and Mrs. Mary
1 Kedilick, id' Williamston
Mrs. Manning vyas noted for her
1 gentleness and kindness. She passed
1 through the long span of life, the
j three score and ten, with such devo
: tii n to duty that she died a friend
; of all.
Sho was, since early life, an ardent
member of the Methodist Church, and
will In' buried by Rev. T.'W: I.ee, as
; .-listed by Rev. A. J. Manning, at the
Short burying ground near Holly
Springs this afternoon.
Frank Brinkley, Well
Known Tobacconist Dies
.T, Frank lirinkley, one of, the most
widely known tobacco men in East
ern Carolina died at his home in
I Greenville Sunday morning. He was
a native of Halifax county, born .in
' Scotland Neck, lie was- 72 years'bld
and Wlls at one time Register of deeds
j-cf Halifax county. After four years
work at that post he entered the to
! luicco business and opened the first
warehouse in Halifax county. A few
I years laU'r lie went to"? Greenville and
was one of the proprietors of the
1 Center llrick warehouse for more than
j2O years, operating as Brinkley,
i Hooker and Spain. He sold his in
trost in that lirm two years ago and
since"thu't time he has beetl engaged
as a buyer and solicitor of tobacco.
Mr. lirinkley was well known in
this county where he had visited every
tobacco farm regularly for almost 20
I years, lie was highly, esteemed by
; everybody for his friendly and kind
ly way among his fellowman had en
j cleared him to hundreds of people. „
| New Series B. & L. Stock
to (»o on Sale Saturday
The Martin County Building & Loan
Association will open sits 20th series
Saturday, March 5.
This association was organized in
11)14, since which time it has matured
and paid out eight series. The as«o
--1 u.tjon hail its best year in 1926, mak
ing a net earning of 8 per cerrt on
all stock. The period of maturity of
stock was fixed by the directors at
5:12 weeks.
The office of the association was
! recently removed from the Dennis
I Simmons Lumber Co, building to the
Farmers &. Merchants Bank building,
wnere Mrs. Earl Wynne, who is treas
urer, may be found Mondays and Sat
urdays'.
The building and loan has proved a
very convenient things to many of
cur townsmen, enabling them to build
at a minimtfm of cost with e«asy pay
ments. Then others have paid little
by little, saving the small sums that
would have gone through the little
outlets that get most of our money. '
Double Header with
Nashville Tomorrow
A double-header is scheduled here
for tomorrow night when Nashville
sends its two teams down to do bat
tie with the local girls and boys.
The games will be played in the
Dixie warehouse.
    

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